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List of Publications from 2014

Abse, Susanna

Abse, S. (2014) 'Couples therapy: taking sides', welldoing.org. Read the full article here
This is a brief look at some of the common anxieties couples have about whose side the therapist will take.

Abse, S. (2014) 'De-stressing society', in Fieschi, C. & Grabbe, H. (eds.) The Bridges Project: New expertise for policy in an age of uncertainty: Counterpoint, pp. 50-51.
This article talks about today’s most pressing health issues and how they can lead to the breakdown of tolerant and cohesive communities.

Abse, S. (2014) 'Intimacy - The Long and Winding Road', in Savege Scharff, J. & Scharff, D.E. (eds.) Psychoanalytic Couple Therapy: Foundations of Theory and Practice. London: Karnac.
The paper summarises and explores key aspects of adult intimacy and how it develops in couples.  The paper explores barriers to intimacy and the need for psychic separation as a pre-requisite for intimate relating. The paper illustrates these ideas with a detailed case history, summarizing key couple concepts and how they relate to the capacity for mature intimate relationships.

Abse, S. (2014) 'Labour needs to use family policy to support and strengthen relationships', New Statesman, New Statesman. Read the full article here
This article suggests that there are no purely economic answers to the problems families face. Poverty and social disadvantage are linked to emotional health.

Abse, S. (2014) 'Psychoanalysis, the secure society and the role of relationships', Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy, 28(3), pp. 295-303.
There is growing concern about how people respond to a fast-changing world in the context of economic decline. Symptoms of distress such as depression and anxiety are reaching epidemic proportions alongside the breakdown of family stability. This paper considers how psychoanalysis can enter the debate about these concerns and whether psychoanalytic theory and practice in the UK has concentrated too much on the individual to the exclusion of the wider family and the community.

Balfour, Andrew

Balfour, A. (2014) 'Developing therapeutic couple work in dementia care – the living together with dementia project', Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy, 28(3), pp. 304-320.
This paper describes an approach to working with couples where one partner has a dementia, which is currently under development at the Tavistock Centre for Couple Relationships. This draws upon video-based methods that have been used with parents and children, as well as in psychoanalytic couple psychotherapy, to develop an intervention to assist emotional contact, communication and understanding in couples living with dementia. Our approach includes the person with dementia and their partner, focussing upon the relationship between them and using shared involvement in everyday activities as a basis for enhancing emotional contact. Evidence is reviewed of the need for such an approach, which aims to foster the resilience of the couple's relationship and strengthen their capacity to manage the emotional challenges of the situation. The importance of services holding a relational view in their delivery and the economic and humanitarian consequences of a neglect of this in dementia-care settings are also discussed.

Cachia, Pierre

Cachia, P. and Savage Scharff, J. (2014) 'Clinical narrative and discussion: a couple who lost joy', in Scharff, D.E. & Savege Scharff, J. (eds.) Psychoanalytic Couple Therapy: Foundations of Theory and Practice. London: Karnac, pp. 201-212.

Cachia, P. and Savage Scharff, J. (2014) 'The ending of couple therapy with a couple who recovered joy', in Scharff, D.E. & Savege Scharff , J. (eds.) Psychoanaltyc Couple Therapy: Foundations of Theory and Practice. London: Karnac, pp. 295-302.

Clulow, Chris

Clulow, C. (2014) 'Attachment, affect regulation, and couple psychotherapy', in Scharff, D.E. & Savege Scharff , J. (eds.) Psychoanalytic Couple Therapy. Foundations of Theory and Practice. London: Karnac, pp. 44-58.
Drawing on developmental psychology, neuroscience and attachment theory this chapter (part of a couple psychotherapy textbook) describes processes by which emotions are regulated in infancy and adulthood and explores some implications of this for couple psychotherapy, paying particular attention to Winnicott’s seminal concept of maternal mirroring.

Clulow, C. (2014) 'Book Review of Eagle, M.N (2013) Attachment and Psychoanalysis: Theory, Research and Clinical Implications ', Couple and Family Psychoanalysis, 4(2), pp. 210-212.
Traversing ground that Fonagy covered in 2001, Eagle’s timely work combines scientific rigour with clinical insight to assemble a wealth of knowledge that this review asserts should have textbook status for practising clinicians.

Clulow, C. (2014) 'Foreword', in Castellano, R., Velotti, P. & Zavattini, G. (eds.) What Makes Us Stay Together? Attachment and the Outcomes of Couple Relationships: Karnac Books, pp. xi-xiv.
Introducing the English translation of a ground-breaking work from a group of Italian academics and psychoanalysts that draws theory and research together to describe couple relationships from an attachment perspective and investigates what makes for stability (but not necessarily satisfaction) in adult partnerships.

Clulow, C. (2014) 'Foreword', in Collett, A. (ed.) It couldn’t happen to me… The unsavoury truth about domestic abuse that every woman and man should read. London: Ornac.
Prefacing three first-hand accounts of women who have experienced coercive, controlling violence in their marriages, drawing particular attention to the pervasive influence of denial in concealing truth.

Clulow, C. (2014) 'Othello and the Questioning of Difference: A Reflection on James Fisher's and Nicholas Hytner's Representations of Shakespeare's Tragedy', Couple and Family Psychoanalysis, 4(1), pp. 101-103.
A comparison of James Fisher’s psychoanalytic and Nicholas Hytner’s military interpretations of Shakespeare’s tragedy, raising questions about whether there are circumstances in which ‘sameness’, and the rejection of ‘otherness’, might be functional.

Supporting partners becoming parents: Lessons from practice and research [video seminar, online]
Contr. Christopher Clulow, Carolyn Pape Cowan and Phillip Cowan, TCCR Video Seminar Series, UK, 18/02/2014. 52 mins 15 secs. Watch the video here
A conversation between Christopher Clulow and Philip Cowan and Carolyn Pape Cowan about the transition to parenthood and the implications of the Cowans’ lifetime work on family transitions for developing effective group intervention programmes.

Clulow, C. and Vincent , C. (2014) 'Barbara Kathleen Dearnley (3 July 1928-6 February 2014): An Appreciation.', Couple and Family Psychoanalysis, 4(2), pp. 230-234.
An appreciation of a woman who devoted most of her professional working life to the Tavistock Centre for Couple Relationships, from the 1960s onwards.

Hewison, D., Clulow, C. and Drake, H. (2014) Couple Therapy for Depression: A Clinician's Guide to Integrative Practice. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Couple Therapy for Depression is an integrative 20-session couple therapy designed to treat depression in couples where there is also relationship distress. Following NICE recommendations it draws on RCT studies of efficacy as well as 'best practice' in behavioural, cognitive, emotionally-focused, systemic, and psychodynamic couple therapies. Sticking closely to the competencies identified for the treatment of depression and relationship distress in couples, it outlines the ways in which couple therapists can reduce damaging interactions between couples, build emotional openness and closeness, improve communication and behaviour, change unhelpful cognitions and perceptions, and help the couple cope with the ordinary and not-so ordinary stresses that arise in the course of everyday relating. It begins by describing the causes and consequences of depression, and then focuses on its impact on the adult couple. Highlighting the particular techniques needed in safe and effective work with distressed couples, it goes through the different ways in which the couple's feelings, thoughts, and behaviours need to be understood and worked with in order to reduce relationship distress. It outlines the treatment of 4 different couples to illustrate the therapy in action and is helpful for any therapist wanting to enhance their work with couples.

Drake, Harriett

Hewison, D., Clulow, C. and Drake, H. (2014) Couple Therapy for Depression: A Clinician's Guide to Integrative Practice. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Couple Therapy for Depression is an integrative 20-session couple therapy designed to treat depression in couples where there is also relationship distress. Following NICE recommendations it draws on RCT studies of efficacy as well as 'best practice' in behavioural, cognitive, emotionally-focused, systemic, and psychodynamic couple therapies. Sticking closely to the competencies identified for the treatment of depression and relationship distress in couples, it outlines the ways in which couple therapists can reduce damaging interactions between couples, build emotional openness and closeness, improve communication and behaviour, change unhelpful cognitions and perceptions, and help the couple cope with the ordinary and not-so ordinary stresses that arise in the course of everyday relating. It begins by describing the causes and consequences of depression, and then focuses on its impact on the adult couple. Highlighting the particular techniques needed in safe and effective work with distressed couples, it goes through the different ways in which the couple's feelings, thoughts, and behaviours need to be understood and worked with in order to reduce relationship distress. It outlines the treatment of 4 different couples to illustrate the therapy in action and is helpful for any therapist wanting to enhance their work with couples.

Hammond, Hendrix

Hammond, H. (2014) 'The stories that go unheard', Context magazine, (no. 135), pp. 16.
This article presents some of my reflections and accounts following my MSc in Family Therapy. McCarthy (2001) suggests that, as systemic therapists, we need to understand: "...how women and their families become vulnerable to and within situations of social inequalities...and how these interactions recursively constitute relationships of power and inequality at whichever social level they occur" (p. 273)

Hewison, David

Hewison, D. (2014) 'Book Review of Hinshelwood, R (2013) Research on the Couch. Single-Case Studies, Subjectivity and Psychoanalytic Knowledge', Journal of Analytical Psychology, 59(4), pp. 578-582.
Hinshelwood’s book is reviewed and commended as providing an excellent account of the debates between ‘science’ and ‘hermeneutics’ as to the nature of knowledge, an outline of the prevalence of single-case studies in the natural sciences, and a careful description of a way of testing psychoanalytic understanding through close observation of clinical interactions in the consulting room.

Hewison, D., Clulow, C. and Drake, H. (2014) Couple Therapy for Depression: A Clinician's Guide to Integrative Practice. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Couple Therapy for Depression is an integrative 20-session couple therapy designed to treat depression in couples where there is also relationship distress. Following NICE recommendations it draws on RCT studies of efficacy as well as 'best practice' in behavioural, cognitive, emotionally-focused, systemic, and psychodynamic couple therapies. Sticking closely to the competencies identified for the treatment of depression and relationship distress in couples, it outlines the ways in which couple therapists can reduce damaging interactions between couples, build emotional openness and closeness, improve communication and behaviour, change unhelpful cognitions and perceptions, and help the couple cope with the ordinary and not-so ordinary stresses that arise in the course of everyday relating. It begins by describing the causes and consequences of depression, and then focuses on its impact on the adult couple. Highlighting the particular techniques needed in safe and effective work with distressed couples, it goes through the different ways in which the couple's feelings, thoughts, and behaviours need to be understood and worked with in order to reduce relationship distress. It outlines the treatment of 4 different couples to illustrate the therapy in action and is helpful for any therapist wanting to enhance their work with couples.

Hewison, D. (2014). Journal Review of Leichsenring, F., & Klein, S. (2014). ‘Evidence for Psychodynamic Psychotherapy in Specific Mental Disorders: A Systematic Review’. Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy, 28.1. In: Journal of Analytical Psychology, 59(4), pp. 596-599.
Leichsenring & Klein’s paper describing a systematic review of the evidence for psychodynamic psychotherapy for named mental disorders is reviewed. The paper is further evidence of the effectiveness of psychodynamic approaches for depression, anxiety, somatoform disorders, personality disorders, eating disorders complicated grief, PTSD, and substance-abuse disorders, showing that they are equivalent to CBT. Claims that CBT is the only effective therapy are proved to be not justifiable or sustainable. Hewison suggests that of greater interest is the question of what seems to work for whom, and how does it do this. He suggests that it is likely to be highly influenced by the relationship between those seeking help and their therapist, rather than any specific model.

Hewison, D. (2014) 'Projection, introjection, intrusive identification, adhesive identification', in Scharff, D.E. & Savege Scharff , J. (eds.) Psychoanalytic Couple Therapy: Foundations of Theory and Practice. London: Karnac, pp. 158-169.
This chapter addresses the nature and processes involved in the kinds of identifications formed by couples through projective and introjective mechanisms. It begins with Henry Dicks’ foundational studies of marital interaction (1967). Then it considers the defensive processes that aim to protect couple relationships but have unconscious and unintended effects. The chapter goes on to discuss projective identification, introjective identification, intrusive identification, and adhesive identification—all different ways of trying to think about the unconscious impact that partners in a couple relationship have on each other. Clinical case illustrations flesh out the theoretical framework and the chapter ends by putting forward the idea that couples are meaning-making relationships, in which meaning comes through the taking back of projections.

Hewison, D. (2014) 'Shared unconcious phantasy in couples', in Scharff, D.E. & Savege Scharff, J. (eds.) Psychoanalytic Couple Therapy: Foundations of Theory and Practice. London: Karnac, pp. 25-34.
This chapter presents a historical review of the development of ideas about unconscious phantasy in individuals and in couples. It looks at the real and spurious distinctions between fantasy and phantasy and the argument about when in human life unconscious phantasy begins. Unconscious phantasies operating in a couple’s way of relating are defended against by various symptomatic interactions, all of them preferable to a feared catastrophe. The chapter examines one example of defence against catastrophe—infidelity.

McCann, Damian

McCann, D. (2014) 'Responding to the clinical needs of same-sex couples', in Scharff, D.E. & Savege Scharff , J. (eds.) Psychoanalytic Couple Therapy: Foundations of Theory and Practice. London: Karnac, pp. 81-90.
Development in thinking about same-sex couples within the field of psychoanalysis is still very much in its infancy. Moreover, the continued reliance on heteronormative thinking as a guide to practice with lesbian and gay couples raises fundamental questions concerning our understanding and management of difference, as well as exposing practitioners and their professional bodies to the charge of homo-ignorance. This chapter aims to raise awareness of the clinical needs of same-sex couples as a means of increasing sensitivity and responsiveness when engaging psychotherapeutically with lesbians and gay men presenting for therapy. The chapter begins with a brief consideration of the ways in which the psychoanalytic profession is responding to the challenges of theory and practice with lesbians and gay men. This is followed by an examination of working with difference, the ways in which unconscious processes affect the couple dynamic and the impact of this on the therapeutic relationship. Specific attention is paid to gender role socialisation, as a way of highlighting the particular qualities and differences within and between lesbian and gay couple, relationships, and the chapter ends with an exploration of therapist factors.

Nyberg, V., McCann, D. and Glausius, K. (In Press) 'The Challenge of Developing a Brief Intervention Service for Couples', Journal of Couple & Relationship Therapy

This paper outlines the development in the UK of a service commissioned by the Department for Education (DfE) from the Tavistock Centre for Couple Relationships (TCCR). The purpose was to develop and evaluate a wellbeing service for couples. The service offered a brief therapeutic intervention of four sessions and was primarily aimed at younger couples in the early stages of parenthood presenting with a focused concern. The paper examines the contextual factors that lead to the development of the service; namely the importance of prevention and the need for early intervention in regard to securing children’s emotional and psychological wellbeing. Particular emphasis was placed on the couple relationship as a foundational factor. The paper also explores the purpose and effectiveness of the brief therapeutic approach and the theoretical underpinnings that informed our work. Case studies are presented to illustrate the application of the four session model. In addition, a set of DVDs was specifically commissioned to enhance the brief intervention and their impact is examined and assessed. The paper concludes with an evaluation of the service.
Key Words: early intervention, time-limited therapy, brief therapy, couples, homework, DVD, developmental dilemma, service development. 

Meier, Richard

Meier, R. (2014) Developing the capability of the health visiting workforce to offer early relationship support: a policy briefing from the Relationships Alliance, UK: Tavistock Centre for Couple Relationships.
The Relationships Alliance believes that strong and stable couple, family and social relationships are the basis of a thriving society. Relationship health is an essential part of the UK’s economic recovery – relationship breakdown will cost the UK £46 billion this year alone, an unsustainable figure. Good quality personal and social relationships are central to our health and well-being. The quality of people’s relationships is an important ‘social asset’, yet one that is often ignored or undermined by public policy. 

Morgan, Mary

Morgan, M. (2014) 'The couple state of mind and some aspects of the setting in couple psychotherapy', in Scharff, D.E. & Savege Scharff, J. (eds.) Psychoanalytic Couple Therapy: Foundations of Theory and Practice. London: Karnac, pp. 125-130.
Psychoanalytic psychotherapy with couples requires a setting in which they feel held and their therapist is able to think. In discussing the nature of the setting, some of my thoughts are drawn from the fundamentals of psychoanalytic setting. the setting is primarily the analytic attitude and the couple state of mind of the therapist, but it also refers to the actual physical setting and arrangements in which the therapeutic process takes place. the two aspects are closely connected.

Morgan, M. (2014) 'Why can being a creative couple be so difficult to achieve? The impact of early anxieties on relating', in Scharff, D.E. & Savege Scharff , J. (eds.) Psychoanalytic Couple Therapy: Foundations of Theory and Practice. London: Karnac, pp. 116-122.
Some of the salient features of the concept of the ‘creative couple’ are described. Two difficulties that some couples experience are described:  anxiety about relating to another and a difficulty in being able to be curious about another. This is linked to early experiences with an intrusive primary object. Vignettes based on couples with these kinds of difficulties are given to illustrate this. The importance of safe setting over time is seen as enabling a non-intrusive curiosity to develop leading to increased containment in the therapy and the relationship.

Morgan, M. and Stokoe, P. (2014) 'Curiosity', Couple and Family Psychoanalysis, 4(1), pp. 42-55.
James Fisher’s work on curiosity and the authors’ own thinking in this area are described. Fisher’s view of curiosity, as a genetic aspect of human nature, and as the essential driver causing the development of the mind and of consciousness, is restated. The focus of curiosity is emotion, and emotion is meaningful. Thus curiosity serves to represent symbolically the meaning of our experience. The authors agree with Fisher, Bion, and Britton that the impulse to curiosity stands alongside the impulse to pleasure, and that the tension between these two impulses affects and guides our psychological and emotional development. The fields of couple psychoanalytic psychotherapy and organisational consultancy are drawn on to demonstrate the centrality of curiosity and to indicate its essential role in the development of a creative couple stage of identity. The importance of anxiety in either stimulating or de-activating curiosity is described. The authors emphasise the balance between the pleasure impulse and the impulse to curiosity by showing that L and H can be seen as the former, while K pertains to the latter. Where anxiety closes down curiosity, it is argued that this is an example of L and H dominating K, and is another way to describe the paranoid–schizoid position.

Nyberg, Viveka

Nyberg, V. and Hertzmann, L. (2014) 'Developing a Mentalization-Based Treatment (MBT) for Therapeutic Intervention With Couples (MBT-CT)', Couple and Family Psychoanalysis, 4(2), pp. 116-135.
This paper outlines the organisation of a new project that aims to develop a model for adapting mentalization-based treatment (MBT) for therapeutic work with couples (MBT-CT), where one or both partners present with personality problems which may be contributing to their relationship difficulties. Describing how the Tavistock Centre for Couple Relationships (TCCR) has developed this project and how a therapeutic model is beginning to emerge from the work, the paper focuses on the rationale and specifics of getting the project off the ground and some of the emerging clinical issues. It does not include clinical illustrations.

Nyberg, V.,McCann, D. and Glausius, K. (In Press) 'The Challenge of Developing a Brief Intervention Service for Couples', Journal of Couple & Relationship Therapy

This paper outlines the development in the UK of a service commissioned by the Department for Education (DfE) from the Tavistock Centre for Couple Relationships (TCCR). The purpose was to develop and evaluate a wellbeing service for couples. The service offered a brief therapeutic intervention of four sessions and was primarily aimed at younger couples in the early stages of parenthood presenting with a focused concern. The paper examines the contextual factors that lead to the development of the service; namely the importance of prevention and the need for early intervention in regard to securing children’s emotional and psychological wellbeing. Particular emphasis was placed on the couple relationship as a foundational factor. The paper also explores the purpose and effectiveness of the brief therapeutic approach and the theoretical underpinnings that informed our work. Case studies are presented to illustrate the application of the four session model. In addition, a set of DVDs was specifically commissioned to enhance the brief intervention and their impact is examined and assessed. The paper concludes with an evaluation of the service.
Key Words: early intervention, time-limited therapy, brief therapy, couples, homework, DVD, developmental dilemma, service development.

Nyberg, V & Hertzmann, L. (2014). Developing a Mentalization-Based Treatment (MBT) for Therapeutic Intervention With Couples (MBT-CT). Couple and Family Psychoanalysis, 2(4) 2014.

Rhodes, Honor

Rhodes, H. (2014) 'Place: a Sense of Yearning to Belong and to be Recognised', Couple and Family Psychoanalysis, 4(2), pp. 111-115.
The paper explores the human need to connect to places; how such places have important meaning and how this need carries within it a sense of loss and displacement, these ideas being made more visible by the many books and online blogs about ‘wilderness’ and emotional geographies.

Thompson, Kate

Thompson, K. (2014) 'A taxonomy of kisses', Oxford University Press's Academic Insights for the Thinking World. Read the full article here
A Taxonomy of Kisses attempts to explore the variety of meanings that may lie behind a simple kiss.  What do couples reveal through kissing? Is a peck on a partner’s cheek in the morning, dashing out of the front door, a mark of affection or to herald relief at being apart for the day…?  In a time-impoverished world, do modern kisses need to communicate more or is this earliest of intimate human gestures remained steadfastly the same?

Wrottesley, Catriona

Wrottesley, C. (2014) 'An Interview with Barbara Dearnley', Couple and Family Psychoanalysis, 4(2), pp. 193-203.
An interview with Barbara Dearnley, who died this year at the age of 86. Barbara joined the Family Discussion Bureau (FDB), forerunner of the present-day Tavistock Centre for Couple Relationships, as a young woman of 32 in 1960. This interview represented a wonderful opportunity to speak first-hand to someone who knew and worked with the redoubtable Lily Pincus, a founder member of the FDB. Lily Pincus’ work – together with that of Kathleen Bannister, Janet Mattinson and Christopher Clulow – is foundational to current couple theory as applied to practice at the Tavistock Centre for Couple Relationships (TCCR) today.