• 020 7380 8288

List of Publications from 2016

Abse, Susanna

Abse, S. (2016) ‘Renewal and Social Justice’, Couple and Family Psychoanalysis, 6(2), pp. 149- 152.

In 2013, Harvey Taylor, a British Psychoanalyst, wrote a groundbreaking paper for the British Psychoanalytic Council (BPC) (Taylor, 2013). In this he proposed that key historical and institutuinal decisions have led inexorably to the current crisis in which psychoanalysis in the UK finds itself. This crisis takes the form of the almost complete disappearance of psychoanalytic work in the National Health Service (NHS), a chronic lack of candidates for psychoanalytic training, and the lack of signifcant voice in public policy and debate.

Casey, Polly

Hertzmann, L, Target, M., Hewison, D., Casey, P., Fearon, P., & Lassri, D. (2016). ‘Mentalization-Based Therapy for parents in entrenched conflict: A random allocation feasibility study’. Psychotherapy, 53(4), 388- 401.

To explore the effectiveness of a mentalization-based therapeutic intervention specifically developed for parents in entrenched conflict over their children. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first randomized controlled intervention study in the United Kingdom to work with both parents post-separation, and the first to focus on mentalization in this situation. Using a mixed-methods study design, 30 parents were randomly allocated to either mentalization-based therapy for parental conflict—Parenting Together, or the Parents’ Group, a psycho-educational intervention for separated parents based on elements of the Separated Parents Information Program—part of the U.K. Family Justice System and approximating to treatment as usual. Given the challenges of recruiting parents in these difficult circumstances, the sample size was small and permitted only the detection of large differences between conditions. The data, involving repeated measures of related individuals, was explored statistically, using hierarchical linear modelling, and qualitatively. Significant findings were reported on the main predicted outcomes, with clinically important trends on other measures. Qualitative findings further contributed to the understanding of parents’ subjective experience, pre- and posttreatment. Findings indicate that a larger scale randomized controlled trial would be worthwhile. These encouraging findings shed light on the dynamics maintaining these high-conflict situations known to be damaging to children. We established that both forms of intervention were acceptable to most parents, and we were able to operate a random allocation design with extensive quantitative and qualitative assessments of the kind that would make a larger-scale trial feasible and productive.

Hewison, D., Casey, P. and Mwamba, N. (2016) 'The effectiveness of couple therapy: Clinical outcomes in a naturalistic United Kingdom setting', Psychotherapy, 53(4), pp. 377

Couple therapy outcomes tend to be judged by randomized controlled trial evidence, which comes primarily from the United States. United Kingdom and European outcome studies have tended to be naturalistic and there is a debate as to whether “laboratory” (RCT) studies are useful benchmarks for the outcomes of “clinic” (naturalistic) studies, not least because the therapies tested in the RCTs are hardly used in these settings. The current paper surveys the naturalistic studies in the literature and presents results from a U.K. setting of 877 individually and relationally distressed participants who completed at least 2 sessions of psychodynamic couple therapy and completed self-report measures assessing psychological well-being (CORE- OM) and relationship quality (Golombok Rust Inventory of Marital State, GRIMS). A clinical vignette is given that demonstrates the psychodynamic approach used. Analysis of the measure data conducted using hierarchical linear modeling showed an overall significant decrease in individual psychological distress for both male and female clients at the end of therapy, with a large effect size of d = −1.04. There was also a significant improvement in relationship satisfaction for both male and female clients, with a medium effect size of d = −0.58. These findings suggest that psychodynamic couple therapy is an effective treatment for couples experiencing individual and relational distress, with effect sizes similar in strength to those reported in RCTs. It argues that naturalistic effectiveness studies should be given a stronger role in assessments of which therapies work.

Clulow, Christopher

Clulow, C. (2016) ‘A Relational Psychoanalytic Approach to Couples Psychotherapy.', Couple and Family Psychoanalysis, 6(1), pp. 115- 117.

A critical review of the application of three relational theoretical themes to the practice of couple psychotherapy. Includes a comment on the prevalence of Kohutian theory in the USA in contrast to the influence of Klein in the UK.

Clulow, C. (2016) ‘Elegy, by Nick Paine at the Donmar theatre’. Couple and Family Psychoanalysis, 6(2): 230- 231.

What to do when you can no longer live with yourself? What is this self that can no longer be lived with? How to forget when memory is diseased? And in the forgetting what remains of relationships and identity?

Glausius, Krisztina

Glausius, K. and Humphries, J. (2016) ‘Couples Who Adopt: A Guide to Helping Adoptive Couples’.

Read here

This publication aims to assist professionals in identifying the concerns and challenges faced by couples who are in the process of adopting or have adopted children and suggest ways of identifying ways to help and support these families.

Hewison, David

Hertzmann, L, Target, M., Hewison, D., Casey, P., Fearon, P., & Lassri, D. (2016). ‘Mentalization-Based Therapy for parents in entrenched conflict: A random allocation feasibility study’. Psychotherapy, 53(4), 388- 401.

To explore the effectiveness of a mentalization-based therapeutic intervention specifically developed for parents in entrenched conflict over their children. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first randomized controlled intervention study in the United Kingdom to work with both parents post-separation, and the first to focus on mentalization in this situation. Using a mixed-methods study design, 30 parents were randomly allocated to either mentalization-based therapy for parental conflict—Parenting Together, or the Parents’ Group, a psycho-educational intervention for separated parents based on elements of the Separated Parents Information Program—part of the U.K. Family Justice System and approximating to treatment as usual. Given the challenges of recruiting parents in these difficult circumstances, the sample size was small and permitted only the detection of large differences between conditions. The data, involving repeated measures of related individuals, was explored statistically, using hierarchical linear modelling, and qualitatively. Significant findings were reported on the main predicted outcomes, with clinically important trends on other measures. Qualitative findings further contributed to the understanding of parents’ subjective experience, pre- and posttreatment. Findings indicate that a larger scale randomized controlled trial would be worthwhile. These encouraging findings shed light on the dynamics maintaining these high-conflict situations known to be damaging to children. We established that both forms of intervention were acceptable to most parents, and we were able to operate a random allocation design with extensive quantitative and qualitative assessments of the kind that would make a larger-scale trial feasible and productive.

Hewison, D. (2016) ‘Growing Up? A Journey with Laughter & Learning from Life: Becoming a Psychoanalyst by Casement P.’, Couple and Family Psychoanalysis, 6(1), pp. 100- 102.

This is a book review of the latest two publications by one of the UK’s most creative psychoanalysts, Patrick Casement. One is a collection of anecdotes by Casement that depict with candour and vividness the first 40 years of his life; the other is a more serious and reflective volume that addresses how he became and developed as a psychoanalyst, The two books are a testament to the need to privilege individual experience over the conformist demands of institutions.

Hewison, D. (2016) 'Journal Review of Fonagy, P 2015 The effectiveness of psychodynamic psychotherapies: an update. World Psychiatry 14.pp 137-150', Couple and Family Psychoanalysis, 6(2), pp. 215-217.

Peter Fonagy’s extensive review of the evidence for psychodynamic psychotherapy as an effective treatment for a variety of mental health disorders aims at doing a number of different things: firstly, it outlines the current confusing state of evidence for psychodynamic therapy, indicating the complexity inherent in trying to rely on heterogeneous research studies; secondly, it goes through a variety of mental health diagnoses indicating where there is evidence for the effectiveness of psychodynamic therapy and where there is not; and finally, it suggests that the whole research endeavour of trying to test families of brand-name psychotherapies against headline diagnoses is a mistaken and fruitless endeavour. He suggests instead paying very close attention to exactly what it is in any therapy that works for any particular person with their individual deficits and difficulties that are hidden under an overarching diagnosis.

Hewison, D., Casey, P. and Mwamba, N. (2016) 'The effectiveness of couple therapy: Clinical outcomes in a naturalistic United Kingdom setting', Psychotherapy, 53(4), pp. 377

Couple therapy outcomes tend to be judged by randomized controlled trial evidence, which comes primarily from the United States. United Kingdom and European outcome studies have tended to be naturalistic and there is a debate as to whether “laboratory” (RCT) studies are useful benchmarks for the outcomes of “clinic” (naturalistic) studies, not least because the therapies tested in the RCTs are hardly used in these settings. The current paper surveys the naturalistic studies in the literature and presents results from a U.K. setting of 877 individually and relationally distressed participants who completed at least 2 sessions of psychodynamic couple therapy and completed self-report measures assessing psychological well-being (CORE- OM) and relationship quality (Golombok Rust Inventory of Marital State, GRIMS). A clinical vignette is given that demonstrates the psychodynamic approach used. Analysis of the measure data conducted using hierarchical linear modeling showed an overall significant decrease in individual psychological distress for both male and female clients at the end of therapy, with a large effect size of d = −1.04. There was also a significant improvement in relationship satisfaction for both male and female clients, with a medium effect size of d = −0.58. These findings suggest that psychodynamic couple therapy is an effective treatment for couples experiencing individual and relational distress, with effect sizes similar in strength to those reported in RCTs. It argues that naturalistic effectiveness studies should be given a stronger role in assessments of which therapies work.

Humphries, Julie

Glausius, K. and Humphries, J. (2016) Couples Who Adopt: A Guide to Helping Adoptive Couples’.

Read here

This publication aims to assist professionals in identifying the concerns and challenges faced by couples who are in the process of adopting or have adopted children and suggest ways of identifying ways to help and support these families.

McCann, Damian

McCann, D. (2016) ‘Book review of Motz A 2014 Toxic Couples: The psychology of domestic violence’ Couple & Family Psychoanalysis, 5, (2), pp, 227-229.

In this powerful and wide-ranging examination of domestic violence within couple relationships, Motz provides a much-needed window into the world of the “toxic couple”, which, as she says, “reflects the interaction of two disturbed individual attachment systems”.

McCann, D. (2016) ‘Teddy Ferrara, by Christopher Shinn directed by Dominic Cooke at the Donmar Warehouse’. Couple and Family Psychoanalysis, 6(2): 227-231.

This theatre review examines a play that deals with loneliness, belonging, gay stereotypes, victimisation, and community in a technological age where the connections are fleeting, angular, and inevitably destructive. Shinn, in this play, was determined to shine a light on the way in which differences within minority groups are played out between them. Ultimately this is a play about uncomfortable truths that reflect both the individual characters’ existence as well as the institutions they inhabit.

Morgan, Mary

Morgan, M. (2016) ‘An Object Relations Approach to the couple Relationship: Past, Present and Future’, Couple & Family Psychoanalysis, Vol 6 (2), pp194-205

Drawing on the work of Tavistock Relationships over the last sixty-eight years, an object relations approach to understanding the couple relationship is described. This is conceptualised as firstly, what the couple brings of their past and how this is responded to defensively and developmentally; secondly, how the couple is progressing developmentally in the process of being “a couple”—how the partners manage the dynamic of there being an “other”; and thirdly, how they might carry on developing in the context of a relationship that could be creative for them both together and individually. A clinical example of a couple who struggled with love and hate illustrates some of these ideas.

Morgan, M. (2016) ‘What does ending mean in couple psychotherapy’, Couple & Family Psychoanalysis, 6(1), pp. 44-58

The subject of endings in couple psychotherapy brings to mind an array of complicated issues to do with the process of engagement, the capacity to keep an ending in mind, the ending of the couple relationship and the ending of the therapy, in the best or worst of circumstances. In the main part of this paper I will focus on two different kinds of ending with couples in therapy, one where there is a thoughtful and planned ending, and the other in which it feels very difficult to contemplate an end. I link the possibility of ending and the difficulty of ending with the aims of couple psychoanalytic psychotherapy. Before exploring this, I touch on the unplanned endings that can occur in a couple therapy, particularly, although not always, in the beginning stages.

Morgan, M. (2016) ‘What is being in a relationship really like? Why relationships are difficult but why we might need them’ Couple & Family Psychoanalysis, Vol 6(2), pp44- 58

In thinking about this conference entitled “Relationships – why bother”, I found myself reflecting on my work with couple relationships over the last 30 years. I thought about what it was that made relationships so difficult to be in for all of us, but also why; nonetheless we might want to be in them, in fact why we might need them. I am going to suggest three of the reasons that relationships are particularly difficult, these difficulties being true of most of the relationships I have encountered. We might all at times feel we don’t want to bother with them but I suggest there are some compelling reasons to do so.

Mwamba, Naomi

Hewison, D., Casey, P. and Mwamba, N. (2016) 'The effectiveness of couple therapy: Clinical outcomes in a naturalistic United Kingdom setting', Psychotherapy, 53(4), pp. 377

Couple therapy outcomes tend to be judged by randomized controlled trial evidence, which comes primarily from the United States. United Kingdom and European outcome studies have tended to be naturalistic and there is a debate as to whether “laboratory” (RCT) studies are useful benchmarks for the outcomes of “clinic” (naturalistic) studies, not least because the therapies tested in the RCTs are hardly used in these settings. The current paper surveys the naturalistic studies in the literature and presents results from a U.K. setting of 877 individually and relationally distressed participants who completed at least 2 sessions of psychodynamic couple therapy and completed self-report measures assessing psychological well-being (CORE- OM) and relationship quality (Golombok Rust Inventory of Marital State, GRIMS). A clinical vignette is given that demonstrates the psychodynamic approach used. Analysis of the measure data conducted using hierarchical linear modeling showed an overall significant decrease in individual psychological distress for both male and female clients at the end of therapy, with a large effect size of d = −1.04. There was also a significant improvement in relationship satisfaction for both male and female clients, with a medium effect size of d = −0.58. These findings suggest that psychodynamic couple therapy is an effective treatment for couples experiencing individual and relational distress, with effect sizes similar in strength to those reported in RCTs. It argues that naturalistic effectiveness studies should be given a stronger role in assessments of which therapies work.

Salter, Liz

Donovan, J. L., Hamdy, F. C., Lane, J. A., Mason, M., Metcalfe, C., Walsh, E., Blazeby, J. M., Peters, T. J., Holding, P., Bonnington, S., Lennon, T., Bradshaw, L., Cooper, D., Herbert, P., Howson, J., Jones, A., Lyons, N., Salter, E., Thompson, P., Tidball, S., Blaikie, J., Gray, C., Bollina, P., Catto, J., Doble, A., Doherty, A., Gillatt, D., Kockelbergh, R., Kynaston, H., Paul, A., Powell, P., Prescott, S., Rosario, D. J., Rowe, E., Davis, M., Turner, E. L., Martin, R. M. and Neal, D. E. (2016) 'Patient-Reported Outcomes after Monitoring, Surgery, or Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer', New England Journal of Medicine, 375(15), pp. 1425- 1437.

Robust data on patient-reported outcome measures comparing treatments for clinically localized prostate cancer are lacking. We investigated the effects of active monitoring, radical prostatectomy, and radical radiotherapy with hormones on patient-reported outcomes.

Thompson, Kate

Thompson, K. (2016) 'Record of a Service using Mentalization-Based Therapy - Parenting together to help resolve entrenched conflict between separated parents over their children, with particular emphasis on the impact of the work on the therapist', Seen and Heard, 26(1).

Wrottesley, Catriona

Wrottesley, C. (2016) ‘An interview with Joy Schaverein’, Couple and Family Psychoanalysis, 6(1), pp. 96- 99.

Wrottesley, C. (2016) ‘Book Review: Tea with Winnicott by Brett Kahr’, Couple and Family Psychoanalysis, 6(2), pp. 221-224.